What I Would Love to Tell my Younger Self #WordsMatter

20 years ago, I …

… was a teen.

I was in Class 11.

I loved to groove to Britney Spears debut song … “Baby one more time”. And yes, it did change the pop music for the years to come. Can’t believe the song is also 20 years old now!

I was quite naive and looked at the world through my pink-tinted glasses. Always took people at face value and lead a very secure life within the four walls of my boarding school. And like every other teenager, I would be deep in my books trying to prepare for that entrance exam which decided my future.

However, looking back I feel, that there are some things which I should have known. 20 years back I was at crossroads where I was pondering over what I wanted? What is it that would keep me awake all night? The idea of real-life calling. Still, I would love to tell my 17-year-old to:

Make no excuses and find a solution for everything. The reality is that no one is actually certain about what they are doing, but they just make it look as though they know what they are doing.

Chase your dreams and create plans on how to achieve them. Try to focus on what makes you happy and find your calling.

Work on self-development by reading and doing things that look fun. Try to become better with each passing day.

Maintain a journal as it helps in becoming a better thinker and writer. Ok, I don’t want the 17-year-old to become a writer but writing helps to communicate clearly. Practising writing every day would help in future.

Help without anything in return and expectations. When you help others without anything in return then amazing things happen. You will realise that it comes back to you in the most unexpected and beautiful manner.

Fear nothing at all as long as it does not threaten your existence. Step out of your comfort zone, do what you want to and enrich your life ten times. Be brave and stand for yourself. Believe in yourself and the world will follow you!

Life is a constant cycle of learning. As Socrates puts it,

“I know one thing, that I know nothing.”

Similarly, believing in this can make us learn so many things. Learning not only from our mistakes but also from the mistakes of our friends and family. These 20 years, I have come a long way, sometimes feeling that I know all. But I am quick to take Socrates advice that I know nothing at all so that each day I learn something new.

What would you like to tell your younger self? I would love to know your thoughts on the same!

The prompt for this month is ‘20 years ago, I.’. I received this tag from Jyoti Babel at Jyoti’s Pages. It’s my pleasure to pass on this tag to Shilpa Gupte at Fictionista. There are 29  of us on this Blog Hop and it will be spread over 3 days – 1st, 2nd and 3rd November  2019. Do follow the #WordsMatter Blog Hop and prepare to be surprised!

 

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Shubhra Rastogi Written by:

Well, about me I can say that I am a certified dentist, healthcare analyst, medical writer and above all a mother of a 6-year-old. Most of my day to day activities revolve around her and she is my inspiration to start this blog. As a mother, I experimented with a lot of new things for my little one in a quest to find the best for her. I just want to share my experiences of being a happy and content mum.

34 Comments

  1. November 2, 2019
    Reply

    17 is a tough time in life – not quite an adult and not a child anymore, and with the weight of parental and other expectations on your shoulder. Your advice to your 17 year old self is spot on. But yes, we never reach a point where we know it all – thank God! 😉

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 3, 2019
      Reply

      Yes, there is never a point where we know it all 🙂

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 3, 2019
      Reply

      Way to go Mahati!

  2. November 3, 2019
    Reply

    Socrates was so right! We are always learning something new everyday. I would tell my 17 year old self only two things now, Learn to come out of your comfort zone and learn to stand up for yourself. Everything else will fall into place then, right?

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 3, 2019
      Reply

      Well said Jyothi!

  3. November 3, 2019
    Reply

    I’d like to advice my younger self to take more chances, to grab opportunities, to not worry about getting knocked down. Instead, focus on getting back up as quickly as possible….
    Love the quote by Socrates. It’s true that once you admit that you truly know nothing, life’s real education begins!

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 3, 2019
      Reply

      Can’t agree much with you Shilpa. If we admit that we know it all we actually stop learning from that day!

  4. November 3, 2019
    Reply

    Life teaches us lessons at every stage. It is tough for sure to be aware of the world and its ways, or even about life at the age of 17.

    I totally agree with the advice you gave your 17-year-old self. That’s precisely what I would say to myself. I would also tell my 17-year-old self to love herself more and be confident of who she is instead of comparing herself to others and suffering from an inferiority complex.

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 5, 2019
      Reply

      This is a piece of good advice. One should never compare oneself with others. It leads to a lot of despair.

  5. November 4, 2019
    Reply

    I did advice my younger self to be consistent, an advice I still need to follow after 20 years.

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 5, 2019
      Reply

      A good one!

  6. November 4, 2019
    Reply

    I feel the teenage years that we spent in school were actually the easier years since the only thing which mattered then was academics. There were also numerous confusions about our emotions to which answers were hard to find. Yet we survived and sailed to reach here today. Love the quote by Socrates and your advice to your 17-year self.

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 5, 2019
      Reply

      Can’t agree enough with you Anamika. Thanks for visiting by.

  7. November 5, 2019
    Reply

    Beautiful lessons to share with your 17-year-old self, Shubhra. Learning doesn’t mean what we read in our school textbooks. That was a learning which I had after my teen years.
    20 years ago, I was a 16-year-old. My advice would be to continue listening to my gut and not to listen to the grown-ups who don’t believe in self-development. Because there were some very stupid advices I got from some adults, had I chose to follow those my life would have been in ruins long ago.

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 5, 2019
      Reply

      I am glad that you took a stand for yourself and chose the best for you.

  8. November 5, 2019
    Reply

    So nice that you would tell your 17 year old self to maintain a journal. I feel it’s the most underrated habit of all! I’ve been keeping a journal since I was in 2nd grade and it has been with me through thick and thin and I’m better for it!

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 5, 2019
      Reply

      I remember i used to write down my day to day activities. My mother was very particular. However, I lost track of it once I started preparing for my entrance exams. I do agree it is a very good habit.

  9. November 6, 2019
    Reply

    At 17 we were so innocent and naive. These are the lessons that life teaches us as we age. I loved the part about giving without expectation. Saves a lot of heartbreak too.

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 6, 2019
      Reply

      Yes, it does! Thanks for visiting by Rajlakshmi!

  10. November 6, 2019
    Reply

    Ah these are the things I’d still tell myself. 20 years ago I was a mother to two teenaged girls. Perhaps, I’d tell myself to handle them with more consideration to their feelings.

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 6, 2019
      Reply

      I am sure you must have done your best!

  11. November 6, 2019
    Reply

    20 years back, I was 10 and used have hell lot of questions on the way this world functions. I lacked words to express then used to document it using sketches in my sketchbook. Later on i moved to writing journals to myself. If only our younger selves got to see these journals we write to them! 🙂

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 6, 2019
      Reply

      Wow, sketches and writing from the tender age of 10. That is really great Keerthi!

  12. November 6, 2019
    Reply

    I would advise the same to my 17-year-old self. However, what I know today is only because I made mistakes then.

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 6, 2019
      Reply

      Until we don’t make mistakes we don’t learn. Making mistakes and then learning from them are the two sides of the coin. Thanks for visiting by!

  13. November 7, 2019
    Reply

    That is a lot of good advice. Some of which I am going to follow too! 🙂

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 8, 2019
      Reply

      I am glad that you found it helpful. Thanks, for reading this!

  14. November 8, 2019
    Reply

    That is a very apt list of things to tell your younger self. I concur!

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 8, 2019
      Reply

      Thanks, Jyoti!

  15. November 9, 2019
    Reply

    I’m glad my younger self knew most of these things. I’d tell my older self to try to keep believing them as long as possible!

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 11, 2019
      Reply

      Thanks for visiting by!

  16. November 9, 2019
    Reply

    One problem with believing that you know “nothing” is that it can be a blow to your self-confidence when you’re surrounded by “know-it-alls.” I think that the more intelligent you are, the more you are aware of just how much you do not know or understand about the world, and it’s important to remember that this is true of EVERYONE, not just you. Some people just project (or ooze) confidence and can fool a lot of people into THINKING that they’re smart, when in reality, what they’re best at is creating a veneer or confidence and fooling a lot of people into thinking they’re smart.

    They intimidate people. On purpose, mostly.

    The most brilliant people I know are often the most humble, knowing that they can learn something new at every turn, and from anyone at any time. They are not arrogant, but recognize their good fortune in being born with a working brain and body, having access to books or schooling, encountering interesting people and places along the way – and they are usually happy to share what they’ve learned or are learning.

    Don’t ever let yourself be intimidated or convinced that you truly know NOTHING. For all you do know, you will never run out of new things to learn.

    • Shubhra Rastogi
      November 11, 2019
      Reply

      I shall keep your advice in mind Holly! 🙂

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